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 Feature Profiles

Physician Spotlight: Dr. Mark Cooper
Usually upon hearing the term "fixer-upper," most of us think real estate. But in real life, Dr. Mark Cooper is the genuine article. Whether it's cars, washing machines, doorknobs, or almost any electronic, Cooper is your man. But unlike Tim Allen's "Home Improvement" character, Cooper specializes in fixing humans. Cooper grew up tearing up washing machines and putting them back together at his father's store, Cooper Furniture & Appliance. From as early as the sixth grade, Cooper told everyone he saw he was going to be a doctor.
BY HOLLY CONNER SHARP

 Nashville Archives

Ready for Rebound
About this time last year, Dr. Reginald W. Coopwood really started to worry. As CEO of the Metropolitan Nashville Hospital Authority and thus at the helm of Nashville General Hospital at Meharry, Coopwood presided over a hospital budget awash in red ink. Headlines speculated the hospital might be forced to close its doors. Metro loaned the hospital millions and, rather uncharacteristically, the state moved swiftly and early to cut Nashville General a $2.02 million check, representing the hospital's share of federal money designated for providers that care for a disproportionate share of uninsured or underinsured patients.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

Why Are Athletes Suffering Heart Attacks?
A seemingly healthy young athlete, a student in the prime of his life with a prime body to prove it, drops suddenly to the basketball court floorboards. He's dead of a heart attack. Researchers across the globe are working to find out why this happens to one in every 200,000 athletes. Mark Anshel, an expert in health and human performance and a professor at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, said there's probably not one cause, but many.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

Skyline Medical and TCMC Join Forces
Replicas of towns don't just exist on movie sets. There's one in middle Tennessee that doesn't require its inhabitants to pretend to be someone else — it allows them to get back to themselves. It's called the Kruegar Independence Square Village and it is part of the newly-named Skyline Madison Campus' rehabilitation program. The name isn't all that's changed. In December, Skyline Medical Center's parent company, TriStar Health System, bought the Tennessee Christian Medical Center (TCMC) from Adventist Health System, and changed the name to Skyline Madison to reflect the merging of the two facilities.
BY STACY FENTRESS

Devising a Plan
Jim Easter, FAAMA, director of planning and a principal with Hart Freeland Roberts, Inc. feels so strongly about the inherent value of master planning that he has spent much of his career honing his skills in this specific area of the healthcare design process. A fellow of the American Academy of Medical Administrators and past chairman of the national board, Easter received his undergraduate degree in architecture from Virginia Tech. In graduate school, he received a prestigious fellowship for hospital design by the American Institute of Architects' Academy of Architecture for Health.
BY CINDY SANDERS

Key Master Planning Steps
· Assess the situation. · Gather facts, workload information and statistics.

Colonizing the Southeast
The year 2006 was an exciting and productive one for First Colony Healthcare, LLC. And why shouldn't it have been, considering, for example, that Solara Healthcare chose First Colony Healthcare (FCH) to develop its $11 million acute care hospital in Muskogee, Oklahoma? "The project is completed," said Tommy Catone, principal and senior vice president of FCH. "Clients have moved in and the grand opening is set. We finished under budget and ahead of schedule."
BY JOHN M. HAYS

Performing Minimally Invasive Video-Assisted Thyroidectomies
In the past, thyroidectomy patients were cut the length of their neck and ended up with a permanent scar called the "necklace." With the use of a video camera and a tiny incision, there is a new way of removing the thyroid that, aesthetically speaking, is a huge leap for patients suffering from this disease.

MTSU Expands Nursing School
Middle Tennessee State University's (MTSU) School of Nursing has undergone many changes since launching in 1966. The recently completed expansion of the physical plant must be counted among the most dramatic changes in the program's history. With the addition of nearly 25,000 square feet of learning and administrative space, the construction project has nearly doubled the size of the Cason-Kennedy Nursing Building (CKNB). The addition, which cost just over $5 million, was made possible by grants from the Christy-Houston Foundation and the United States Department of Health and Human Services.
BY CINDY SANDERS

Saint Thomas and Williamson Medical Forge Cardiac Alliance
Hospitals interested in tackling the arduous process toward accreditation as a Chest Pain Center may very well go it alone. Yet, for many smaller hospitals in Middle Tennessee and southern Kentucky, Saint Thomas Health Services is ready to lend a hand. In fact, Williamson Medical Center in Franklin has already taken the healthcare system up on the offer.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

DOH Releases Report on Heart Disease and Stroke
In its first report dedicated solely to heart disease and stroke rates in Tennessee, the state Department of Health (DOH) in December released sobering statistics that confirmed that poor nutrition and inactivity are killing Tennesseans at an alarming pace. "I think, overall, the document supported what the department felt were some of the key issues in Tennessee. So there was no great surprise," said Donna Henry, director of the department's Division of Health Promotion.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

Reduce Taxes When Building, Renovating or Purchasing Space
If you plan to purchase, construct or renovate a building (or have done so in the past), you could save a bundle in taxes if you invest in a cost segregation study. An underused tax strategy, cost segregation can help you get the maximum return on your real estate investment by reducing taxes and increasing cash flow.
BY KEVIN DOSTALER, CPA

Nip/Tuck Episode Spurs Interest in G-Spot Shots
Though it's unclear which came first, life mimicking television or vice versa, a recent "Nip/Tuck" episode on Grafenberg Spot (G-spot) enhancements is one example of the ever-growing blur between Hollywood reality television and the real world. Now, just as depicted in the FX smash hit, there really is a G-Shot® to heighten female sexual pleasures. In fact, show producers approached Dr. David Matlock, the Beverly Hills physician that invented the shot, to make sure of the details, which patients say is "the ultimate in sexual ecstasy achieved in an effortless manner."
BY GLORIA BUTLER BALDWIN

Lincoln Memorial University Launches New Osteopathic College
Dr. A.T. Still would be so proud. Still, the founder of American osteopathic medicine, was born in 1828 in Lee County, Va., just 30 miles from Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) in Harrogate, Tenn. On Aug. 1, classes are set to begin at the new DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine on the LMU campus.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

New Health Regulations Take Effect In 2007
With each New Year come changes, opportunities and also new regulations. Yes, Virginia, healthcare is the most regulated industry in the country, and with the new year comes new regulatory requirements for hospitals, physicians and other healthcare organizations. Effective January 1, 2007, healthcare providers that receive $5 million or more annually in Medicaid payments must have updated their compliance policies, employee handbooks and education materials to cover state and federal false claims acts, as well as whistleblower protections, as required by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA).
BY RICHARD G. COWART

Intelligent Design
Even those outside the healthcare industry generally recognize that creating a functional but healing environment is a highly specialized skill … part science, part art. For those actually faced with the task of expanding, renovating or creating a new facility, finding that balance of form and function for a variety of audiences with very different needs, all while staying on budget and without disturbing the flow of care, can be a very daunting prospect indeed.
BY CINDY SANDERS

New Research Raises Questions about Angioplasty and Stents
Cardiology patients may be more than a bit concerned these days, what with new research results questioning late angioplasty and several studies finding that drug-coated stents may increase the risk of blood clots. But Dr. Bo Walpole Jr., an interventional cardiologist at Saint Thomas Hospital, has this advice: Don't overreact. In Dec. 7, 2006, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, New York University researchers reported that, while balloons and stents can be lifesaving in the first hours after a heart attack, angioplasty three or more days later often isn't worth the trouble.
BY SHARON H. FITZGERALD

Year in Review and Look Ahead – More of the Same?
The year 2006 ended on a high note and the year produced the best returns in three years. The market had a nasty midyear correction caused by rising interest rates, fuel costs and inflation. As well, a sharp decline in residential real estate demand had investors nervous. All this turned around in the third and fourth quarters as reality proved more benign.
BY BOB BOLEN

CON Legislation—Volunteer Style
Providing healthcare requires facilities. And that means land, buildings, development, and all that goes with it. To help shape and control the development of these facilities, Tennessee, along with most other states, operates a certificate of need (CON) program. As information from the Tennessee Health Services and Development Agency (HSDA) puts it, "The CON program serves as a growth management and cost savings tool since it requires certain health providers to establish the need for new services and facilities before the providers will be allowed to build facilities, become licensed, or conduct certain business.
BY JOHN M. HAYS

LBMC Managing Partner Appointed Chair To Leadership Committee
David Morgan has been appointed Chair of the Private Companies Practice Session (PCPS) Executive Committee, a leadership group within the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Morgan, CPA and partner at the Nashville-based Lattimore, Black, Morgan & Cain, PC will lead the 15-member committee for a term of up to three years.

Dr. David Dunn and Dr. David Zielske Author New Coding Reference
Dr. David Dunn, a vascular surgeon, has collaborated with Dr. David Zielske (Dr. "Z"), who is the founder and President of ZHealth Publishing. Dr. Dunn is the primary author of a new coding reference, works closely with David Zielske MD, who have recently completed their 1st edition of Vascular & Endovascular Surgery Coding Reference.

Dr. Charles Morton Joins Baptist Hospital's Metabolic Surgery Center
Charles E. Morton, MD, has joined the Metabolic Surgery Center at Baptist Hospital.

AmMed Direct Names Director Of Better Care Program®
Lorraine Farrar APRN, MSN, BC-ADM, CDE, who has more than 17 years of experience working with people with diabetes, has been named director of the Better Care Program® for AmMed Direct, a Nashville-based company that provides direct-to-consumer specialty services for people with diabetes.

Sarah Cannon Research Institute Elects Board Member
The board of governors for the Sarah Cannon Research Institute (SCRI) has elected a new board member, Dr. J.D. Hickey.

Tyler Promoted To Director Of Human Resources At Saint Thomas Hospital
Saint Thomas Hospital recently announced the promotion of Cathy Tyler to Director of Human Resources. Tyler earned her BS in Hospitality Management from the University of Alabama.